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  • Water worlds could have plumes of nutrients carried up from down below | Universe Today
    Tuesday, June 28, 2022
    Earth's oceans are one huge, uniform electrolyte solution. They contain salt (sodium chloride) and other nutrients like magnesium, sulphate, and calcium. We can't survive without electrolytes, and life on Earth might look very different without the oceans' electrolyte content. It might even be non-existent. Are these life-enabling nutrients available on water worlds? Baptiste Journaux, acting instructor of Earth and space sciences at the UW, is quoted. Read More
  • On alien worlds, exotic form of ice may transport nutrients | Space
    Wednesday, June 22, 2022
    A high-pressure form of water ice known as ice VII has been shown to be capable of transporting salts rather than expelling them. Any potential alien life in the waters of vast ocean worlds could receive vital nutrients from their planets' molten cores via thick layers of exotic high-pressure ice that can transport salts, new research has found. Baptiste Journaux, acting instructor in Earth and space sciences at the UW, is quoted. Read More
  • Dave Montgomery's new book: healthier soils mean healthier people.
    Friday, June 17, 2022
    ESS faculty member, geomorphologist David Montgomery, has been exploring how practices that rebuild soil health affect the quality of the food that comes from that soil. His new book, co-written with his spouse Anne Biklé, explores this question. Read More
  • Seismologist: Oregon earthquakes not a precursor of the 'Big One' | MyNorthwest
    Friday, June 17, 2022
    You can take a breath of relief -- the earthquakes that occurred in the Pacific Ocean off the Oregon coast this week are not a precursor of the "Big One." Several earthquakes rattled the waters a few hundred miles west of Newport, Ore. early Wednesday morning, ranging from magnitudes of 3.8 to 5.6. Harold Tobin, director of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network and professor of Earth and space sciences at the UW, is quoted. Read More
  • Study says worst-case Northwest tsunami risk is underestimated | KIRO 7
    Thursday, June 9, 2022
    It's hard to imagine anything worse than the 2011 tsunami in Japan. But a professor at the University of Southern California says an even larger tsunami could potentially hit the Northwest coast if a Cascadia mega quake strikes in an offshore wedge. Harold Tobin, director of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network and professor of Earth and space sciences at the UW, is interviewed. Read More
  • A mega-tsunami in the Pacific north-west? It could be worse than predicted, study says | The Guardian
    Tuesday, June 7, 2022
    Scientists find the size of the 'outer wedge' of a faultline can magnify a rupture's impact, worrying news for a fault running from Vancouver Island to northern California. Harold Tobin, director of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network and professor of Earth and space sciences at the UW, is quoted. Read More
  • Study: Regenerative farming boosts soil health, yielding more nutritious crops | Mongabay
    Friday, June 3, 2022
    A recent study, published in the journal PeerJ, compared the nutritional content of food crops grown using conventional versus regenerative farming practices -- those that build the soil by using cover crops, a diverse rotation of crops, and minimal tilling. David Montgomery, professor of Earth and space sciences at the UW, is quoted. Read More
  • Dinosaur apocalypse: The last day | PBS
    Friday, May 13, 2022
    PBS NOVA explores a new theory for what caused the dinosaur extinction, based on evidence from Montana. UW Provost Mark Richards, professor of Earth and space sciences, is interviewed (beginning at 16:50). Read More
  • Pandemic delays afflict polar science
    Monday, May 9, 2022
    The COVID19 pandemic has had a significant impact on Antarctic sciences, hitting an enterprise that was already stretched. Among the projects affected is the UW-led "Hercules Dome ice core". Project lead Eric Steig (ESS faculty member and Chair) is quoted in the article in the journal, Science. Read More
  • Huge groundwater system discovered under Antarctica | Gizmodo
    Friday, May 6, 2022
    Geophysicists used remote sensing to see reservoirs beneath the surface. That water could speed up the loss of ice as the climate warms. Brad Lipovsky, assistant professor of Earth and space sciences at the UW, is quoted. Read More