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  • NSF Plots a Course for the Next Decade of Earth Sciences Research
    Thursday, May 21, 2020
    ESS faculty Kate Huntington is highlighted today for her leadership on the decadal vision for Earth Sciences at NSF, produced by the National Academies. A new report released this week by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, "A Vision for NSF Earth Sciences 2020–2030: Earth in Time", lays out recommendations for how the National Science Foundation (NSF) should invest in the next decade of Earth sciences research. The report highlights 12 priority questions for the field to explore from 2020 to 2030, from the deceptively simple “What is an earthquake?” to the more urgent “How can Earth science research reduce the risk and toll of geohazards?”

    Link to full report:
    https://www.nap.edu/catalog/25761/a-vision-for-nsf-earth-sciences-2020-2030-earth-in?mc_cid=042f9a6a09&mc_eid=9b486ee580 Read More
  • How routine monitors weather the pandemic storm | Eos
    Tuesday, May 19, 2020
    Much of routine monitoring can be done remotely these days, but networks aren't completely immune to COVID-19's society-halting symptoms. Harold Tobin, director of the UW-based Pacific Northwest Seismic Network and professor of Earth and space sciences at the UW, is quoted. Read More
  • Scientist killed in Mount St. Helens eruption remembered 40 years after deadly blast | KING 5
    Monday, May 18, 2020
    David Johnston, a scientist studying Mount St. Helens when it erupted in 1980, was killed in the blast. His body was never recovered. Steve Malone, emeritus research professor of Earth and space sciences at the UW, is quoted. Read More
  • A plate boundary emerges between India and Australia | Eos
    Monday, May 18, 2020
    Tectonic plates blanket the Earth like a patchwork quilt. Now, researchers think they've found a new plate boundary -- a line of stitching in that tectonic quilt -- in the northern Indian Ocean. Kevin Kwong, a postdoctoral scholar in Earth and space sciences at the UW, is quoted. Read More
  • 2.9 earthquake out of Mead, WA felt across the Inland Northwest on Friday afternoon | KREM
    Monday, May 18, 2020
    A 2.9 magnitude earthquake hit Mead, Washington around 2:30 p.m. on Friday according to the United States Geological Survey. Paul Bodin, UW research professor of Earth and space sciences and network manager of the UW-based Pacific Northwest Seismic Network, is referenced. Read More
  • 40 years after Mount St. Helens eruption, pandemic sparks parallels | Geekwire
    Sunday, May 17, 2020
    Seismologist Steve Malone, emeritus research professor of Earth and space sciences at the UW, feels a magnitude-5.1 rumble of deja vu whenever he hears the latest developments in the debate over reopening businesses amid the coronavirus outbreak. It reminds Malone of the debate that raged in the days before Mount St. Helens blew its top on May 18, 1980. Read More
  • 1,000-year-old bones represent oldest tsunami victims in East Africa | National Geographic
    Wednesday, May 13, 2020
    A thousand years ago, a thriving early Swahili village bustled on the banks of Tanzania's Pangani River a few miles inland from the Inidan Ocean. Residents built their houses out of wood lattices daubed with earth. They filled their nets with fish and crafted beads from shells. And then one day, a tsunami barreled in, triggered by an earthquake on the other side of the Indian Ocean. Jody Bourgeois, professor emeritus of Earth and space sciences at the UW, is quoted. Read More
  • Seismologists to host virtual event on 40th anniversary of Mount St. Helens eruption
    Tuesday, May 12, 2020
    snow-covered mountain with smoke

    Mount St. Helens as it appeared in 1982, two years after its catastrophic eruption on May 18, 1980.U.S. Geological Survey

    The Pacific Northwest Seismic Network, based at the University of Washington, will host an online event on the 40th anniversary of the eruption of Mount St. Helens, featuring seismologists from the UW and other institutions who can explain the events before, during and after the historic blast.

    The virtual event will take place from 6:30 to 8 p.m., Monday, May 18, on the PNSN's YouTube channel — exactly 40 years after the blast. The group will stream prerecorded talks from four speakers and then host a live Q&A of questions on the network's Facebook page. Moderator Harold Tobin, director of the PNSN and a UW professor of Earth and space sciences, will select audience questions.

    Mount St Helens 40th Anniversary

    • Attend the virtual event
    • Read "After the Ashes" in UW Magazine’s March issue — an excerpt from "After The Blast: The Ecological Recovery of Mount St. Helens" published by UW Press
    • View historical photos of Mount St. Helens from UW Libraries Special Collection

    The presenters will review the region's tectonics, volcanoes and volcanic hazards, and summarize how the science and monitoring has evolved over the past four decades.

    Steve Malone, research professor emeritus of Earth and space sciences, was intimately involved with recording and interpreting the earthquake buildup to the massive eruption. His personal story of the two months leading up to the 1980 eruption will illustrate the difficulty and uncertainty of dealing with a developing natural disaster in real time.

    Seth Moran did his doctorate at the UW with Malone and is now scientist-in-charge at the U.S. Geological Survey's Cascade Volcano Observatory. He will describe the more recent activity at Mount St. Helens and the USGS work on volcano monitoring throughout the Cascades.

    Jackie Caplan-Auerbach, a professor of geophysics at Western Washington University whose research focuses on volcanoes and landslides, will discuss plate tectonics and the origin of the Cascade volcanoes.

    Josef Dufek, professor at the University of Oregon, will discuss the individual character of different volcanoes and volcanic hazards.

    The crater of Mount St. Helens.

    The volcanic crater of Mount St. Helens.U.S. Geological Survey

     

    For more information on the event, contact PNSN communications director Bill Steele at wsteele@uw.edu or 206-685-5880.

     

    Read More
  • Faculty/staff honors: Distinguished contributions to Asian studies, social equity award, Swedish physical geography honor (Dave Montgomery), new Cascade Public Media director
    Wednesday, May 6, 2020

    Recent honors to University of Washington faculty and staff have come from the Association of Asian Studies, the American Society of Public Administration, the Swedish Society for Anthropology and Geography and Cascade Public Media.

    Historian Patricia Ebrey receives Association of Asian Studies’ top award for 2020

    The Association of Asian Studies has given UW historian Patricia Buckley Ebrey its 2020 Award for Distinguished Contributions to Asian Studies. The award, the highest the association bestows, honors outstanding scholarship in the field.

    Patricia Ebrey

    The Association of Asian Studies has given UW historian Patricia Buckley Ebrey its 2020 Award for Distinguished Contributions to Asian Studies. The award, the highest the association bestows, honors outstanding scholarship in the field.

    Ebrey is the Williams Family Endowed Professor of History. She has written or edited many works on China and East Asia as well as a sourcebook on China for undergraduate teaching. She has written over 70 journal articles and book chapters and her works have been translated into several other languages.

    Praising Ebrey for groundbreaking efforts in several areas, the association said in a news release: “By editing or co-editing volumes of scholarly work, and by providing translations and reproductions of primary materials, she has dedicated herself to developing the historical study of China both in terms of research and teaching.”

    Read more and watch a video of Ebrey’s thanks for the honor at the Association of Asian Studies website.

    * * *

    UW political scientist Christopher Parker joins Cascade Public Media board of directors

    Christopher Parker, UW professor of political science, has been chosen to join the board of directors for Cascade Public Media, the nonprofit home of KCTS 9 television and Crosscut.

    Christopher Parker

    Christopher Parker, UW professor of political science, has been chosen to join the board of directors for Cascade Public Media, the nonprofit home of KCTS 9 television and Crosscut.

    Parker has taught at the UW since 2006 and is the author of two books, “Change They Can’t Believe In: The Tea Party and Reactionary Politics in Contemporary America” (with Matt Barreto, 2013) and “Fighting for Democracy: Black Veterans and the Struggle Against Supremacy in the Postwar South” (2009). His next book, planned for this year, is “The Great White Hope: Donald Trump, Race, and the Crisis of American Democracy.”

    Parker was one of two new directors named, along with Holly Mesrobian, a UW alumna who is a director of engineering at Amazon Web Services. The appointments were announced April 28. Also on the Cascade Public Media board is Anita Ramasastry, UW professor of law.

    “Not only is the world of media changing rapidly, the world itself is changing at a breakneck pace,” Robert Dunlop, CEO of Cascade Public Media, said of the two new directors. “Their insights will be extremely valuable as we continue to bring the people of our region news and programming that informs and inspires.”

    * * *

    Terryl Ross receives 2020 social equity award from American Society of Public Administration

    The American Society of Public Administration has given Terryl Ross, assistant dean of diversity, equity and inclusion in the UW College of the Environment, its 2020 Gloria Hobson Nordin Social Equity Award for 2020.

    Terryl Ross

    The American Society of Public Administration has given Terryl Ross, assistant dean of diversity, equity and inclusion in the UW College of the Environment, its 2020 Gloria Hobson Nordin Social Equity Award for 2020.

    The award recognizes lifetime achievement in the cause of social equity. Candidates are evaluated on the consistency, level and duration oftheir work on social equity as well as the impact of their efforts. The society’s 8,000-some members are practitioners, academics and students.

    Ross came to the UW in 1992 as a doctoral student in the Educational and Communication Technology Program housed in the College of Education and later created the group Multicultural Organization of Students Actively Involved in Change, or MOSAIC.

    “Ross continues to work in diversity and inclusion today as he collaborates with college stakeholders to envision diversity, equity and inclusion efforts across the college,” the association wrote.

    The award, established in 2003, is named for a longtime employee of the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Office of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity.

    * * *

    David Montgomery honored by Swedish Society for Anthropology and Geography

    David Montgomery

    David Montgomery

    The Swedish Society for Anthropology and Geography has awarded David Montgomery, UW professor of Earth and space sciences its 2020 Vega Medal for achievements in physical geography. He was honored his work in the field of geomorphology -- the study of the origin and evolution of landforms.

    Montgomery has written several popular science books as well as teaching materials and over 200 articles. The society praised his impact on the research community. His last book was “Growing a Revolution: Bringing Our Soil Back to Life,” published in 2017.

    “He has studied everything from the ways that landslides and glaciers influence the height of mountain ranges, to the way that soils have shaped human civilizations now and in the past,” the society wrote in its award announcement.

    The society was founded in 1878 and is supported mainly by the King of Sweden. Its objective is to promote the development of anthropology, geography and closely related sciences in Sweden and serve as a link between scientists in these disciplines, and the public.

    The award, one of two informally referred to as the Nobel prize of geography, is named for the ship of Swedish explorer Adolf Erik Nordenski?ld, who discovered the Northwest Passage in 1881.

    Read more on the College of the Environment website.

    * * *

    In other faculty news:

    Openness letter: Marina Alberti, UW professor of urban design and planning in the College of Built Environments, was one of 31 scientists to sign an open letter to the journal Science calling for more openness in coronavirus modeling. “Call for transparency of COVID-19 models” was published in Science on May 1.

    “A hallmark of science is the open exchange of knowledge, the cosigners wrote. “We strongly urge all scientists modeling the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic and its consequences for health and society to rapidly and openly publish their code ... so that it is accessible to all scientists around the world.”

    Seattle Channel meets Indigo Mist: The Seattle Channel recently filmed a visit with the UW School of Music faculty members who comprise the improvisational music group Indigo Mist: professors Juan Pampin, Cuong Vu, Ted Poor and Richard Karpen, the school’s director -- Steve Rodby, artist in residence (and longtime Pat Metheny Group bassist). The school took note in its April newsletter.

    “You just let go and let your creativity do its thing,” Vu said in the video, describing the group’s creative approach. Whatever art comes out of that, he said, is “going to make sense - and it’s going to be uniquely your expression.”

    Watch the Youtube video:

    Read More
  • New data from martian meteorite hints at conditions for early life | Forbes
    Thursday, April 30, 2020
    Japanese researchers have found tantalizing traces of ancient organic molecules containing nitrogen in an Antarctic meteorite known to have come from Mars. David Catling, a professor of earth and space sciences at the UW, is quoted. Read More