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  • The College of the Environment has created a CoEnv COVID-19 Resources page.
    Thursday, June 10, 2021
    The College of the Environment has created a CoEnv COVID-19 Resources page for faculty, staff, graduate, and undergraduate students. Read More
  • Is potassium a key to understanding the ocean’s past?
    Monday, March 1, 2021
    When looking at a periodic table, potassium might not be the first element you’re drawn to – distracted instead by gold, copper or silver. But a new paper published in Science Advances suggests we should be paying more attention to this abundant substance. Read More
  • Nisqually earthquake 20 years later -- are we prepared for the next big one? | KIRO 7
    Monday, March 1, 2021
    It's been 20 years since the Nisqually earthquake shook the region. It was one of the biggest earthquakes to rattle the area in decades. The UW's Bill Steele, director of outreach and information services at the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network; Ken Creager, professor of Earth and space sciences; and Harold Tobin, director of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network and professor of Earth and space sciences at the UW, are interviewed. Read More
  • Opinion: Twenty years after 6.8 Nisqually earthquake, are we ready for the Next One? | The Seattle Times
    Sunday, February 28, 2021
    "The passing of decades quickly lulls us into a false sense of complacency, but another earthquake just like Nisqually -- or worse -- could happen at any time. Knowing that the 1949 and 1965 quakes were very similar to the one in 2001, seismologists believe that chances are better than even that another Nisqually will happen in the coming few decades," writes Harold Tobin, director of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network and professor of Earth and space sciences at the UW. Read More
  • Holzworth discusses WWLLN and lightning science on German Public Radio
    Friday, February 26, 2021
    An interview featuring Prof. Robert Holzworth and other lightning scientists was broadcast 2/25 on German Public Radio (Bavaria station). The interview covered recent publications including The Global Distribution of Superbolts, and more recently Lightning in the Arctic (both published in American Geophysical Union journals.) Read More
  • Fleets of radar satellites are measuring movements on Earth like never before | Science
    Thursday, February 25, 2021
    Individual GPS stations can track surface movements of less than 1 millimeter, but a technique called interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) can measure changes almost as subtle across a swath hundreds of kilometers wide. That has made it a vital tool for Earth scientists studying the heaves and sighs of our restive planet. Ian Joughlin, a glaciologist at the UW, is quoted. Read More
  • The first organism to use oxygen may have appeared surprisingly early | Science
    Thursday, February 25, 2021
    The first organisms to "breathe" oxygen -- or at least use it -- appeared 3.1 billion years ago, according to a new genetic analysis of dozens of families of microbes. Roger Buick, professor of Earth and space sciences at the UW, is quoted. Read More
  • Fossilized teeth flesh out the tale of the earliest primates | GeekWire
    Wednesday, February 24, 2021
    The shapes of fossilized teeth from 65.9 million-year-old, squirrel-like creatures suggest that the branch of the tree of life that gave rise to us humans and other primates flowered while dinosaurs still walked the earth. The UW's Gregory Wilson Mantilla, Burke Museum curator of vertebrate paleontology and professor of biology, and Brody Hovatter, a graduate student in Earth and space sciences, are quoted. Read More
  • State asks people to opt-in to earthquake early warning system test alert Thursday
    Monday, February 22, 2021
    For years, UW has been working with many other groups to create ShakeAlert. The early warning system uses a network of seismic sensors -- 300 alone in the state of Washington -- to detect an earthquake. Harold Tobin, director of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network and professor of Earth and space sciences at the UW, is quoted. Read More
  • State continues work to install early warning earthquake system despite COVID-19 | KOMO 4
    Monday, February 22, 2021
    The ongoing coronavirus pandemic has not slowed work to track earthquake activity around Western Washington, and in fact, experts say they have made more progress in their efforts than ever before in a single year. Harold Tobin, director of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network and professor of Earth and space sciences at the UW, is interviewed. Read More