Paul Bodin's Profile Picture

Paul Bodin
Research Professor
Network Manager, Pacific NW Seismic Network
Office: ATG-145
Phone: 206-616-7315
Fax: 206-543-0489 (shared)
Email: [javascript protected email address]
Interests: Seismology; Earthquake sources; Earthquake effects; Hazard mitigation.
Research Groups: Seismology and Tectonics

Education:
Ph.D. : University of Colorado, Boulder; 1992
M.S. : Humboldt State University; 1981
B.A. : University of California San Diego; 1975
Graduate Students:

Current Research:
I manage the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network, a Tier-1 Regional Seismic Network that is the authoritative source for information about active seismicity in the states of Oregon and Washington. The PNSN (www.pnsn.org) consists of approximately 250 seismic stations (short period, strong-motion, and broadband) throughout the PacNW. This venerable and storied network is being upgraded and strengthened, with new sensors, communication technologies, acquisition and processing software and hardware, to meet the region's public safety and scientific needs will into the 21st century.

I came to this position recently, after a dozen years as a professor at the University of Memphis, in Memphis, TN. In mid-continent I studied intraplate earthquakes and hazards associated with low-probability high-impact earthquakes. Much of my effort is currently spent on the PNSN upgrade, so currently do not teach classes, but hope to find time to do this when the current frenzy has subsided! I do work with graduate students individually; a singularly rewarding experience.

I study earthquakes and their effects. In part with the goal of trying to mitigate their consequences, and in part with the goal of trying to understand the physics that govern their occurrence. I am an observationalist, and never met a data set I couldn't find something of interest in.

Research projects I am working on currently:
1. Swarm seismicity (field studies of Enola, AR, and Maupin, OR, sequences)
2. Seismic observations of building damage (the Natural Resources Building, in Olympia, WA)
3. Non-linear wave propagation effects during strong ground shaking
4. Aftershock probabilities in the Pacific Northwest
5. Seismicity and seismic wave propagation within the Pacific Northwest
6. Tremor (especially triggered tremor)
7. Combining geodetic and seismic observations
Recent Publications:
Bodin, P., J. Vidale, T. Walsh, R. Caker, and M. Celebi, 2012. Transient and long-term changes in seismic response of the Natural Resources Building, Olympia, WA due to earthquake shaking. Journal of Earthquake Engineering DOI:10.1080/13632469.2012.655060 (In the press).

De Angelis, S., and P. Bodin, Watching the wind: seismic data contamination at long-periods due to atmospheric pressure-field-induced tilting. Bull. Seis. Soc. Am., 102:3 (In the press)

Lawrence, Z., P. Bodin, C. A. Langston, F. Pearce, J. Gomberg, P.A. Johnson,
F. Y. Menq, and T. Brackman, 2008, Induced dynamic nonlinear ground response
at Garner Valley, California. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America,
Vol. 98, No. 3, pp. --, doi: 10.1785/0120070124.

Delorey, A., J. Vidale, J. Steim, P. Bodin, 2008, Broadband Sensor
non-linearity during moderate shaking. Bulletin of the Seismological Society
of America, Vol. 98, No. 3, pp. --.

Gomberg,J., J. L. Rubinstein, Z. Peng, K. C. Creager, J. E. Vidale, P. Bodin,
2008, Widespread Triggering of Nonvolcanic Tremor in California, Science,
Vol. 319. no. 5860, p. 173. DOI: 10.1126/science.1149164. (Originally
published in Science Express on 22 November 2007)

Rubinstein, J. L., J. E. Vidale, J. Gomberg, P. Bodin, K. C. Creager, and
S. D. Malone, 2007, Non-volcanic tremor driven by large transient shear
stresses, Nature 448, 579-582, doi:10.1038/nature06017.